THE ARTIST IS ONLINE | König Galerie | 18.3.–18.4.2021
THE ARTIST IS ONLINE
PAINTING AND SCULPTURE IN THE POSTDIGITAL AGE
18 MARCH - 18 APRIL 2021
KÖNIG GALERIE | SALEROOM 

CLICK HERE:
3D VISIT
SALEROOM

KÖNIG presents the international group exhibition THE ARTIST IS ONLINE. PAINTING AND SCULPTURE IN THE POSTDIGITAL AGE curated by Anika Meier and Johann König. In the gallery around 70 works are shown by 50 artists, who are at home on social media. In the media of painting and sculpture, they react to the mechanisms of the attention economy and to technological innovations. They digitize painting, visualize data sets and reflect the mobility of images.

Art critic Isabelle Graw writes that today’s new found interest in painting – has it ever gone away? – can be explained by internet platforms such as Instagram, Facebook and Twitter.  In her essay “The Value of Liveliness” Graw notes: “I believe that painting is particularly well positioned in such a society because it gives the impression of being in life of the author.” After artists have used Instagram to perform over the past ten years, painting now is able to redeem what social media has triggered: the longing for limitless individuality. Which is what it's all about on the screen: the pursuit of individuality and indulging in consumption accompanied by a greed for attention.

For the generation of artists born around 1990, painting in the post-digital age has become a mashup of art-historical references, most evidently, when the styles of the Old Masters, Surrealism, Pop Art and Post-Internet Art are sampled. The result is portraits of people, bodies and animals that lose themselves in pathetic poses.  Femininity is deconstructed (Sarah Slappey, Rosie Gibbens) and masculinity is over-performed (Pascal Möhlmann, Evgen Copi Gorisek). The cult of self-expression is celebrated (Chris Drange) and consumerism is exhibited (Oli Epp, Travis Fish).

While content-related access to painting in the post-digital age is one possibility, formal access via the integration of technology is another. Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality and Artificial Intelligence can all be used to digitise painting. Ai-Da is a humanoid robot and an artist who arguably proves that an artificial intelligence can produce a creative achievement. According to her creator, the gallery owner and art dealer Aidan Meller, that means creating works that are new, surprising and have value. She has cameras in her eyes and paints and draws what she sees.  Is Ai-Da creative? Is her art good?  And is the question of whether her art is good even relevant? The French artist Ben Elliot meanwhile creates PERFECT PAINTINGS generated by software based on data about the most popular contemporary works, while American Gretchen Andrew hacks Google to fulfil her wishes and dreams: a cover story in Artforum, winning the Turner Prize, participating in Art Basel Miami Beach and now an auction record.

Artists: Trey Abdella, Ai-Da, Gretchen Andrew, Daniel Arsham, Banz & Bowinkel, Aram Bartholl, Arno Beck, Lydia Blakeley, Ry David Bradley, Arvida Byström, Damjanski, Stine Deja, Rachel de Joode, Maja Djordjevic, Chris Drange, Johanna Dumet, Hannah Sophie Dunkelberg, Ben Elliot, Oli Epp, Liam Fallon, Travis Fish, Rosie Gibbens, Evgen Copi Gorišek, Cathrin Hoffmann, Andy Kassier, Nik Kosmas, Brandon Lipchik, Jonas Lund, Miao Ying, Pascal Möhlmann, Rose Nestler, Hunter Potter, Grit Richter, Rachel Rossin, Manuel Rossner, David Roth, Aaron Scheer, Pascal Sender, Sarah Slappey, Fabian Treiber, Theo Triantafyllidis, Anne Vieux, Amanda Wall, Fabian Warnsing, Thomas Webb, Jessica Westhafer, Anthony White, Chloe Wise, Hiejin Yoo, Janka Zöller


SELECTED ARTISTS

Canadian painter Chloe Wise is one of the portraitists of her generation.  She paints friends and people around her. “These are people,” Wise says, “who defy characterisation. That is why those portrayed are either naked or wearing what we wear today, adidas and Lacoste, for example.”

The British artist, Oli Epp, paints using an airbrush beings that lie somewhere between humans, worms and lumps of meat. Baseball cap on your head, cigarette behind your ear, headphones in your ears. In the post-digital age, people are always connected and yet simultaneously isolated from their environment.

Chris Drange does not paint or even portray himself. For him it is about playing with authorship and originality, a process he continues via the medium of painting.  Where there is no longer an original, painting also becomes a fake and a copy.  Drange selects photos of influencers like Kylie and Kendall Jenner on Instagram and produces a simplified and at the same time precise composition on a computer, which is in turn enlarged 1:1 by a computer in a machine learning factory in Lithuania.  This file is used as a blueprint for a painting produced at an oil painting factory in China.

Sarah Slappey is part of a movement of artists who are turning back to surrealism.  How is femininity performed for the male gaze?  Femininity and sensuality, the grotesque and violent are to the forefront in Slappey's paintings.

Rosie Gibbens, a British performance artist, also deconstructs the idealised image of women.  She explores how women are portrayed in the media and advertising.  How are women's bodies presented and consumed on Instagram?  “I want to become an object, that's why I build machines and make sculptures that are made from parts of my body.  I objectify and sexualise myself.  Can I thereby empower myself?” asks Gibbens.

The Dutch painter Pascal Möhlmann adores the Old Masters and collaborates with Virgil Abloh, the current artistic director at Louis Vuitton menswear.  Möhlmann calls his style ‘new beauty with a punk rock attitude’ because he turns away from cynicism and irony.  He makes use of art history from the image archive and covers, for example, a Descent from the Cross by Rubens and the myth of Narcissus.  While Rubens' body of Christ is taken from the cross in tears, Möhlmann takes the pathetic pose to reflect the state of intoxication from searching for the self in the post-digital age.

For Trey Abdella painting becomes a mashed-up collage of film quotes, cartoon characters and consumer goods.  In his paintings Abdella celebrates the remix culture of the internet.  He works with acrylic paint, airbrush, materials and textures, fusing the analog and the digital when he uses tools from the latter and objects of the former.

As noted, Ai-Da is both a humanoid robot and an artist. A total of fifteen people, including a team at Oxford University, helped Ai-Da develop her artistic skills.  When asked what creativity means to her, Ai-Da replies: “I don't experience the meaning of creativity in the same way humans do.  I aim to encourage people to think about their futures.  These new technologies are powerful and we must be aware of how we use them.  If my artwork encourages this reflection, then I should be happy."  Her creator Meller explains “Ai-Da’s work is valuable to society because she helps us question who we are and where our future is going."

The aforementioned, Gretchen Andrew calls herself a search engine artist and internet imperialist.  She creates self-styled vision boards in which she designs her future as an artist.  It is about goals, hopes and dreams.  Andrew’s work takes up the girlish aesthetic that has become known under the rubric ‘selfie feminism’ in recent years.  She works with metadata and search engine optimization (SEO) online, to place her vision boards as the top search results on Google.  “I take advantage of the search engine's inability to read wishes.  The internet only knows relevance.  The machine already gives me what I want for my future.  A cover story in Artforum.” says Andrew.  Although she calls herself a search engine artist, her performative work on the internet actually results in a performance irl (in real life).  Everyone who reports on her art and exhibits her art becomes part of this performance and brings her one step closer to her goals.

What will become of the medium of painting in virtual reality?  The German artist Manuel Rossner pursues this question in virtual worlds and in real space.  He notes “With a controller that forwards the position of my hand in 3D space to the computer, my movements are converted into lines, which in turn become voluminous elements” about his work process.  "The objects that result are both sculpture and painting."

Please click here for press images and the press release.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

A large selection of the works is on display in the KÖNIG virtual gallery to make the exhibition accessible to the international audience.

The app KÖNIG GALERIE can be downloaded from the App Store.

THE ARTIST IS ONLINE
PAINTING AND SCULPTURE IN THE POSTDIGITAL AGE
18. März - 18. April 2021
KÖNIG GALERIE | SALEROOM 

KLICKEN SIE HIER:
3D VISIT

KÖNIG präsentiert die internationale Gruppenausstellung THE ARTIST IS ONLINE. PAINTING AND SCULPTURE IN THE POSTDIGITAL AGE kuratiert von Anika Meier und Johann König. In der Galerie werden rund 70 Werke von 50 Künstler:innen gezeigt, die in den sozialen Medien zu Hause sind. Sie reagieren in den Medien Malerei und Skulptur auf die Mechanismen der Aufmerksamkeitsökonomie und auf technologische Neuerungen, sie digitalisieren Malerei, visualisieren Datensätze und reflektieren die Mobilität von Bildern.

Das neue Interesse an Malerei – war es jemals weg? – erklärt sich auch durch Plattformen wie Instagram, Facebook und Twitter, schreibt Isabelle Graw in ihrem Essay „The Value of Liveliness“: Ich glaube, dass die Malerei in einer solchen Wirtschaft besonders gut positioniert ist, da sie den Eindruck erweckt, mit dem Leben ihres Autors gesättigt zu sein.“ Nachdem Künstler:innen Instagram in den vergangenen zehn Jahren mit Performances durchgespielt haben, löst Malerei ein, was die sozialen Medien ausgelöst haben: Die Sehnsucht nach grenzenloser Individualität. Und darum geht es auch auf der Leinwand: um das Streben nach Individualität und das Schwelgen im Konsum, begleitet von einer Gier nach Aufmerksamkeit.

Die Malerei im post-digitalen Zeitalter wird bei der Generation, der um 1990 geborenen Künstler:innen zu einem Mashup aus kunsthistorischen Referenzen, wenn etwa auf den Stil der Alten Meister, auf Surrealismus, Pop Art und Post-Internet Art zurückgegriffen wird. Es entstehen Porträts von Menschen, Körpern und Tieren, die sich in pathetischen Posen verlieren.
Weiblichkeit wird dekonstruiert (Sarah Slappey, Rosie Gibbens) und Männlichkeit überperformt (Pascal Möhlmann, Evgen Copi Gorisek), der Selbstdarstellungskult wird zelebriert (Chris Drange) und der Konsumwahn ausgestellt (Oli Epp, Travis Fish).

Der inhaltliche Zugang zur Malerei im post-digitalen Zeitalter ist die eine Möglichkeit, der formale über Einbindung von Technologie ist die andere. Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality und Künstliche Intelligenz kommen zum Einsatz, um Malerei zu digitalisieren. Ai-Da ist ein humanoider Roboter und eine Künstlerin, die unter Beweis stellen soll, dass eine Künstliche Intelligenz eine kreative Leistung erbringen kann. Und das heißt laut ihres Schöpfers, dem Galeristen und Kunsthändler Aidan Meller, Werke zu schaffen, die neu und überraschend sind und Wert haben. Sie hat Kameras in den Augen und malt und zeichnet, was sie sieht. Ist Ai-Da kreativ? Ist ihre Kunst gut? Und ist die Frage, ob ihre Kunst gut ist, überhaupt relevant? Der Franzose Ben Elliot derweil lässt PERFECT PAINTINGS von einer Software basierend auf Daten zu den beliebtesten zeitgenössischen Werken generieren, während die Amerikanerin Gretchen Andrew Google hackt und sich ihre Wünsche und Träume erfüllt: eine Titelgeschichte in Artforum, den Gewinn des Turner Prizes, die Teilnahme an der Art Basel Miami Beach und jetzt einen Auktionsrekord.

Künstler:innen: Trey Abdella, Ai-Da, Gretchen Andrew, Daniel Arsham, Banz & Bowinkel, Aram Bartholl, Arno Beck, Lydia Blakeley, Ry David Bradley, Arvida Byström, Damjanski, Stine Deja, Rachel de Joode, Maja Djordjevic, Chris Drange, Johanna Dumet, Hannah Sophie Dunkelberg, Ben Elliot, Oli Epp, Liam Fallon, Travis Fish, Rosie Gibbens, Evgen Copi Gorišek,
Cathrin Hoffmann, Andy Kassier, Nik Kosmas, Brandon Lipchik, Jonas Lund, Miao Ying, Pascal Möhlmann, Rose Nestler, Hunter Potter, Grit Richter, Rachel Rossin, Manuel Rossner, David Roth, Aaron Scheer, Pascal Sender, Sarah Slappey, Fabian Treiber, Theo Triantafyllidis, Anne Vieux, Amanda Wall, Fabian Warnsing, Thomas Webb, Jessica Westhafer, Anthony White, Chloe Wise, Hiejin Yoo, Janka Zöller


AUSGEWÄHLTE KÜNSTLER:INNEN

Die kanadische Malerin Chloe Wise ist die Porträtistin ihrer Generation. Sie malt Freunde und Menschen aus ihrem Umfeld. „Das sind Menschen“, sagt sie, „die sich einer Charakterisierung entziehen.” Deshalb sind die Porträtierten bei ihr entweder nackt oder tragen, was man heute so trägt, adidas und Lacoste beispielsweise.

Der Brite Oli Epp malt mit dem Airbrush Wesen zwischen Mensch, Wurm und Fleischklumpen. Baseballcap auf dem Kopf, Zigarette hinter dem Ohr, Kopfhörer in den Ohren. Der Mensch im postdigitalen Zeitalter ist immer verbunden und doch von der Umwelt abgeschottet.

Chris Drange malt und porträtiert gar nicht erst selbst. Bei ihm geht es um das Spiel mit Autorschaft und Originalität, er führt es im Medium der Malerei weiter. Wo es kein Original mehr gibt, wird auch die Malerei zum Fake und zur Kopie. Drange wählt Fotos von Influencerinnen wie Kylie und Kendall Jenner auf Instagram aus und produziert eine vereinfachte
und gleichzeitig präzise Komposition am Computer, die in einer Machine Learning Manufaktur in Litauen von einem Computer 1:1 auf das Endmaß vergrößert wird. Diese Datei dient in einer Manufaktur für Ölmalerei in China als Blaupause für das Gemälde.

Sarah Slappey ist Teil einer Bewegung von Künstler:innen, die sich wieder dem Surrealismus zuwendet. Wie wird Weiblichkeit für den männlichen Blick performt? In Slappeys Gemälden stehen Weiblichkeit und Sinnlichkeit, Groteske und Gewalt im Vordergrund.

Auch die britische Performance-Künstlerin Rosie Gibbens dekonstruiert das idealisierte Bild der Frau. Wie werden Frauen in Medien und Werbung dargestellt? Wie werden die Körper von Frauen auf Instagram präsentiert und konsumiert? „Ich möchte zum Objekt werden, deshalb baue ich Maschinen und mache Skulpturen, die aus Körperteilen von mir bestehen. Ich objektiviere und sexualisiere mich selbst. Kann ich mich dadurch selbst ermächtigen?“, fragt Gibbens.

Der holländische Maler Pascal Möhlmann verehrt die Alten Meister und kollaboriert mit Virgil Abloh. Neue Schönheit mit Punk-Rock-Attitüde nennt er seinen Stil, weil er sich von Zynismus und Ironie abwendet. Er bedient sich im Bildarchiv der Kunstgeschichte und covert beispielsweise eine Kreuzabnahme von Rubens und den Mythos von Narziss. Während bei Rubens der Leichnam von Christus unter Tränen vom Kreuz genommen wird, nimmt Möhlmann die pathetische Pose, um den Rauschzustand auf der Suche nach dem Ich im postdigitalen Zeitalter zu reflektieren.

Bei Trey Abdella wird die Malerei zu einem Mashup, zu einer Collage aus Filmzitaten, Cartoonfiguren und Konsumgütern. In seinen Gemälden feiert er die Remix-Kultur des Internets. Er arbeitet mit Acrylfarbe, Airbrush, Materialien und Texturen. Er verschmilzt das Analoge und das Dialoge, wenn er digitale Werkzeuge und analoge Objekte nutzt.

Ai-Da ist ein humanoider Roboter und eine Künstlerin. Sie erschafft Kunstwerke, die neu und überraschend sind und einen Wert haben. Das sagt einer ihrer Schöpfer, der Galerist und Kunsthändler Aidan Meller. Insgesamt haben fünfzehn Menschen, darunter ein Team an der Universität Oxford, Ai-Da zu ihren Fähigkeiten verholfen. Sie hat Kameras in ihren Augen und malt und zeichnet, was sie sieht – einen Menschen, eine Landschaft. Auf die Frage, was Kreativität für sie bedeutet, antwortet Ai-Da: „I don’t experience the meaning of creativity in the same way humans do. I aim to encourage people to think about their futures. These new technologies are powerful and we must be aware of how we use them. If my artwork encourages this reflection, but then I should be happy.“ Meller erklärt: „Her work is valuable to society because she helps us question who we are, and where our future is going.”

Gretchen Andrew nennt sich selbst Search Engine Artist und Internet Imperialistin. Sie erstellt so genannte Vision Boards, in denen sie ihre Zukunft als Künstlerin entwirft. Es geht um Ziele, Hoffnungen und Träume. Sie greift die mädchenhafte Ästhetik auf, die unter dem Begriff Selfie-Feminismus in den vergangenen Jahren bekannt geworden ist. Wenn Andrew online mit Meta-Daten und SEO arbeitet, erscheinen ihre Vision Boards als Top-Suchergebnisse bei Google. „Ich nutze die Unfähigkeit der Suchmaschine, Wünsche lesen zu können. Das Internet kennt nur Relevanz. Die Maschine gibt mir schon jetzt, was ich mir für meine Zukunft wünsche. Eine Titelgeschichte in Artforum,” sagt Andrew. Sie nennt sich zwar Search Engine Artist, aber eigentlich resultiert aus ihrer performativen Arbeit im Internet eine Performance irl. Jeder, der über ihre Kunst berichtet und ihre Kunst ausstellt, wird Teil dieser Performance, da sie so ihren Zielen einen Schritt näher kommt.

Was wird aus dem Medium Malerei in der virtuellen Realität? Dieser Frage geht Manuel Rossner in virtuellen Welten und im realen Raum nach. „Mit einem Controller, der die Position meiner Hand im 3D-Raum an den Computer weitergibt, werden meine Bewegungen in Linien umgewandelt, die wiederum zu voluminösen Elementen werden“, so Rossner über seinen Arbeitsprozess. „Es entstehen Objekte, die Skulptur und Malerei sind.“

Die Pressebilder und die Pressemitteilung finden Sie hier.


ZUSÄTZLICHE INFORMATIONEN

Eine große Auswahl der Werke ist in der virtuellen Galerie von KÖNIG zu sehen, damit die Ausstellung für das internationale Publikum zugänglich ist.

Die App KÖNIG GALERIE kann im App Store heruntergeladen werden.