Video art at Midnight with JEREMY SHAW

#73: Jeremy Shaw

Friday, Mar 18th, 2016, 24:00 | midnight 

BABYLON, Rosa-Luxemburg-Platz, Berlin, big cinema hall
(Eintritt frei | admission free) 


Once a month on a Friday always at Midnight the two art enthusiasts Olaf Stüber and Ivo Wessel invite artists to show their work on the big screen of the “Dispositif Cinema” and to put them up for discourse. Every night is dedicated to one artist. The artist is present. Often there are shown first releases but also live acts, such as performances, concerts or artist talks.

The aim of Videoart at Midnight is to offer a forum for Berlin’s international art scene and to give an insight in to an artist media, which is gaining an increasing importance within the contemporary art production. Some times there are „stars“ such as Omer Fast, Anri Sala, Harun Farocki, Douglas Gordon, Phil Colins or Candice Breitz but also young and emerging artists.

Videoart at Midnight has become a cult event within the Berlin art scene which attracts up to 500 visitors on some evenings including curators, critics and of course artists.

Videoart at Midnight is a non-profit project. It's free and open to the public.

More news

EXHIBITIONS: GALLERY WEEKEND BERLIN 2017

KÖNIG GALERIE celebrates the 2017 Gallery Weekend Berlin with three new solo exhibitions. The sculpture garden at St. Agnes, which was first inaugurated a year ago, is also being largely redesigned for the occasion. More

MICHAEL SAILSTORFER GETS AUGUST MACKE PRIZE

Michael Sailstorfer receives the August Macke Prize of the Hochsauerlandkreis 2017. The Macke Prize is endowed with 20,000 euros and is awarded every three years. More

Erwin Wurm at Kunsthaus Graz

The exhibition by Erwin Wurm in the Kunsthaus Graz takes as its starting point the open architectural structure of the Kunsthaus. Elements of the performative, participatory and sculptural form are thus connected to one another and to the building. More

KIKI KOGELNIK AT KUNSTHALL STAVANGER

The exhibition, which includes several works that have not been on view since the 1960s, emphasizes Kogelnik’s explorations in technology and newly available materials, and her concerns regarding the containment and objectification of women’s bodies. More